What is the world's best Jewish film? You decide

Posted on October 14th, 2018
By Keren David for The JC
The Jazz Singer, or Son of Saul? A new survey wants to know your favourite Jewish movie


Comedian Matt Lucas, film maker Gurinder Chadha and actress Maureen Lipman have cast their votes in a quest to find the world’s favourite Jewish film.


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Creative Trauma

Posted on October 7th, 2018
By Melanie Thernstrom for Tablet Magazine 
Two thousand years of suffering and exile help an Israeli NGO teach Syrian and Iraqi refugees to build new lives in Europe


For more than three millennia, the Yazidi people had lived clustered around the sacred Sinjar Mountains in Northern Iraq. It was there, in the small hours of the morning of Aug. 3, 2014, that Maia’s life as she had known it ended.

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Anti-Semitism Among the WASP Elite

Posted on September 30th, 2018
by Kitty Zeldis for The Lilith Blog


The idea for my novel Not Our Kind was born at Vassar College, where I was a student in the 1970s, where there was enough visible diversity to make a Jewish girl feel she was not alone. I encountered plenty of Jews, both students and faculty. Yet while I didn’t experience much overt anti-Semitism, I felt keenly aware that Vassar had historically excluded people like me—I was the “not our kind” of my eventual novel’s title. 

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In ‘Tracking Edith,’ how an Austrian Jewish woman turned unpaid Communist spy

Posted on September 23rd, 2018
By ANNE JOSEPH for The Times of Israel
Released this summer in the UK and screening in Tel Aviv in March, Peter Jungk’s documentary on his mysterious photographer great aunt is a dark picture of Soviet espionage


LONDON — Every family has its secrets, says writer and director Peter Stephan Jungk at the opening of his gripping documentary, “Tracking Edith.” His family’s was revealed only decades later.


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How the “Schindler of Iran” Saved Hundreds of Persian Jews

Posted on September 16th, 2018
BY ZACHARY SOLOMON for Jewniverse


A dispatch from the annals of forgotten righteous gentiles:

Abdol Hossein-Sardari, the Iranian Consul in Nazi-occupied France, saved hundreds of Iranian Jews from certain death with a heroic ingenuity worthy of his nickname, “Schindler of Iran.”

 

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