Sweet Kugel Makes for a Sweet New Year

Posted on September 17th, 2017

 

This month we are featuring recipes from our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 
By LAURA for Mother Would Know


Kugel is the kind of dish that lends itself to endless variations and numerous occasions. A pudding, savory or sweet, it is traditionally served on the Sabbath and for meals during the Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur holidays.

But in my family, it’s also a favored dish for weekdays from early fall, right through to the beginning of summer. In fact, my kids used to eat sweet kugel at least once a week and more often if I didn’t groan when they requested it yet again.

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Pomegranate and Honey Glazed Chicken

Posted on September 10th, 2017

 

This month we are featuring recipes from our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 
BY LIZ RUEVEN for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 
Pomegranates, or rimonim in Hebrew, are one of the most recognizable and highly symbolic fruits in Jewish culture.


Pomegranates, or rimonim in Hebrew, are one of the most recognizable and highly symbolic fruits in Jewish culture. Originating in Persia, these reddish, thick skinned fruit (technically a berry) begin to appear in markets at end of summer and are readily available for holiday cooking by Rosh Hashanah.

According to Gil Marks in The Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, the abundance of seeds, nestled into a white membrane and encased in a protective and leathery skin, is associated with the 613 commandments in the Torah. They serve as symbols of righteousness and fruitfulness as expressed in the Rosh Hashanah expression, “May we be full of merits like the pomegranate (is full of seeds).”

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Moroccan-Style Vegetable Stew

Posted on September 3rd, 2017
  This month we are featuring recipes from our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

 


BY NAVA from VegKitchen


This delicious Moroccan-inspired stew looks as good as it tastes. It’s a wonderful way to warm up cold season dinners, with sweet sugar pumpkin or butternut squash in an aromatic broth. This can also be a wonderful choice for fall Jewish holidays — Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)and Sukkoth. Adapted from Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons by Nava Atlas.

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How to Make Rainbow Falafel

Posted on August 27th, 2017
BY ALY MILLER for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 
Enjoy not just one kind of homemade falafel but three healthful flavors.


The rainbow bagel trend, admittedly, isn’t my favorite — neon just isn’t that appetizing to me, and I’ve always been suspicious of too much food coloring. I do love colorful foods, though — as long as those vibrant hues come from things like spices, herbs, flowers (like these fuschia hibiscus donuts!), fruits and vegetables.

While making falafel the other day, we were inspired by the bright shade of green that resulted from just a few handfuls of fresh cilantro and parsley. We were using our friend Sandy Leibowitz’s recipe for falafel sliders, which is so easy and delicious that we decided to try and make other shades of falafel.

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What is Schmaltz?

Posted on August 20th, 2017
By Shannon Sarna for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 
What you need to know about this beloved rendered poultry fat.


You have probably heard the word “schmaltz.” But have you wondered, wait — what is schmaltz? Schmaltz is rendered fat, usually chicken fat. But it can also be duck fat or goose fat. (Learn more about other Jewish food terms here.)

And schmaltz  is a much beloved substance by many — it is revered in Eastern European Jewish cooking for its richness, flavor and that it is easy and cheap to make, using every part of the animal. It’s also an alternative to butter, which cannot be used when cooking meat or chicken according to kosher dietary laws.

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